On This Hanukkah

One lightHanukkah Menorah

piercing

the darkness

Two lights burning so true

Three lights

glowing, glowingGLOWING

                                                     with goodness

Four lights shining for generosity to others

Five lights sparkling with

    JOYFULNESS

Six lights illuminating our path

Seven lights radiating our

thankfulness

Eight lights blazing and brilliant

Filling our hearts and our homes

     with love

and with light.

Posey Salem | 12/6/2015

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There’s Good Writing and the Other Kind

We wanted to share this tidbit from writer and author, Chuck Sambuchino. His full article on WritersDigest.com can be found below. The article has some great writing tips, but we especially liked number 6.

Learn what good writing is: Honestly, there’s so much terrific writing out there, but there is also considerably more garbage as well. I’m constantly surprised by how many people don’t know the difference between the good and the bad. Art is subjective, true, but it isn’t that subjective when you remove ignorance and replace it with education.

Duke Ellington said it best: “There are two kinds of music. Good music, and the other kind”. The same applies to writing.

10 Tips for Writing or at http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-to-literary-agents/10-tips-for-writing?et_mid=775410&rid=250848070

Have a great writing week,

~ Avi and Posey

Vague Words

Thanks to Kim Williams-Justesen for this blog post. She shares fun insight to help us cut vagueness and use descriptive words to put colorful imagery in our writing. Out with the dull and in with the WoW!

Kim W. Justesen - Writer/Teacher/Presenter

Often in an early draft of a book I find that I have used “lazy language” to convey an idea.  These words look like they’re trying to do something, but in reality, they manage to lie on the page, limp and lifeless. There are vague nouns and vague verbs, and surprisingly there are vague adjectives, too.

Whatever the cause of these nondescript descriptive words being in our manuscripts, the hard fact is: they need to be removed.  What these lame and lifeless words manage to do is take up space without actually furthering the writing, whether it’s a story or an essay.  How does one spot these words?  It takes practice, and a willingness to do a little extra digging when it comes time for revision.

Let’s look at a few examples. What kinds of words would be considered vague?

Nouns that are broad and undefined fall into the vague…

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